Q. Why is there a service charge for standby and fire protection customers?

A. The water system has been designed and sized to accommodate a specific quantity and quality of water. The annual fixed costs associated with the capital expenditures to have that water available during the peak demands are recovered by the fees.

 

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Q. I am on a private well. Where do I get my water tested?

Regular well testing is recommended by the RI Dept. Health (annually or when there is suspected problem). We use RIDOH standards for our water quality. The RIDOH has a web page with information and labs that will test your well.

 

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Q. Should I winterize my house before the winter?

A. If you plan to leave your summer home for the winter it is important to call the BIWC or plumber to get your meter removed and water shutoff. This will prevent any pipes from freezing over the winter months.

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Q. Is the water safe to drink?

A. Yes, the water meets or exceeds all Rhode Island Dept. of Health. and E.P.A. standards. We required by federal law to submit a Consumer Confidence Report, or CCR. The CCR, is an annual water quality report that a community water system is required to provide to its customers. The CCR helps people make informed choices about the water they drink. They let people know what contaminants if any, are in their drinking water, and how these contaminants may affect their health. CCRs also give the system a chance to tell customers what it takes to deliver safe drinking water.

 

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Q. Is fluoride added to the water?

A. No.

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Q. When can I expect to get my bill?

A. Everyone is billed monthly. If you do not receive your bill, please call the

Finance Office @ (401) 466-3208.

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Q. I have just received my water bill, why is it higher than normal?

A. You may have a leak, your meter may have been misread, you may have simply used more water than normal - especially during the summer months. A leaking toilet can account for over 30,000 gallons per month! Customers often times are unaware of how much water they actually use. Please call the Water Company for a review of your account.

If you think the overusage is the result of a leak, plumbing, or metering problem then you need to contact us and possibly hire a licensed plumber to come to your property and survey the problem. If the problem demonstrates that the usage is unjust, you may request a formal hearing before the Water and Sewer Board of Commissioners in the form of a letter signed by the licensed plumbed outlining the event. The letter will be reviewed at the normal monthly meeting of the New Shoreham Sewer and Water Commissions.

You would be amazed at what can cause a high water bill.

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Q. How do I read my meter?

A. There are two different meters in our system. If your meter has a black lid, simply flip up the lid and read the numbers. For other meters follow these directions. Each unit on your bill equals 1,000 gallons.

 

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Q. Where do I find a plumber on Block Island?

A. There are four plumbing contractors on Block Island.

-Block Island Plumbing and Heating 466-5930

-Double Ender Plumbing 466-2849

-Tripler Plumbing and Heating 466-2889

-Bill Vallee Plumbing and Heating(401) 486-3033

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Q. I want to hook up to the water system, what do I have to do?

A. Our permitting page will answer all your questions regarding new hook ups

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Q. What is allocation, and where do I purchase it?

A. Allocation is a one time purchase that is maintained for the property that it is associated. When a customer purchases allocation, they are buying a portion of the water treatment plants' available allotment. The amount purchased depends upon the needs of the individual property during the summer season (July, August, and September). The allocation purchase is based on their summers usage because that is when the demand is the highest. When a customer exceeds their purchased allocation for their property, they will either incur penalty charges, or they have the option of purchasing more allocation to the amount they exceeded before Oct 31st of each year.

To calculate how much allocation is going to cost and some examples, you can use our online allocation calculator

AllocationCalculator

The BIWC determines the available allocation for sale each year by looking at the annual summer usage minus the water treatment plants capacity.

Purchasing allocation and question can be directed towards Mona Helterline at 401-466-3231 or nssc@new-shoreham.com

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Q. I have penalty charges on my bill, what should I do?

A. If you incurred penalty charges on your bill it is because you exceeded your allocation allotment for that given summer quarter. The summer quarter usage is defined as the total gallons used during the months on July, August, and September. The total summer quarter usage times 1000 gives you the total gallons used for that period. If you exceed you purchased allocation, then there are overusage penalties associated with the account. Sewer overusage penalties are $17 per thousand gallons over the purchased allocation. Water overusage penalties are $55 per thousand gallons over the purchased allocation.

For example, if the property has purchased 20,000 gallons of allocation for their property and they used 25,000 gallons total over the summer quarter, they will have exceeded their allocation by 5,000 gallons. The penalty charges on this account would be $85 for sewer and $275 for water.

There are a few steps you need to consider when you have exceeded your allocation.

1. Determine whether or not this will occur again next year.

2. If you think it will occur again, you need to purchase more allocation to the amount that will be needed for future demands of your property. If you do not purchase the allocation, you will be charged the full penalties for your account that year. If you want to compare purchasing allocation versus paying the penalty you can use our online allocation calculator.

3. If you think the overusage is the result of a leak, plumbing, or metering problem then you need to contact us and possibly hire a licensed plumber to come to your property and survey the problem. If the problem demonstrates that the penalty is unfair or unjust, you must request a formal hearing before the Water and Sewer Board of Commissioners in the form of a letter signed by the licensed plumbed outlining the event. The letter will be reviewed at the normal monthly meeting of the New Shoreham Sewer and Water Commissions.

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Q. How does Reverse Osmosis work ?

A. RO works by passing water through a semi-permeable membrane that separates the pure water into one stream and the salt water into another stream. The process is called "reverse osmosis" because it requires pressure to force pure water across a membrane, leaving the impurities behind.

Click on icon for animation on how RO water treatment membranes work

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Copyright New Shoreham Water District ©

Site Designed and Maintained by Block Island Water Co.

 

New Shoreham Water District, PO Box 998, Block Island, RI 02807 / 401-466-3232/ BIWater@new-shoreham.com

 

In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture Policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, age, or disability.  If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA office, or call (866)632-9992 to request in the form.  Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202)690-7442 or email at program.intake@usda.gov.

The New Shoreham Sewer Commission and Water Board are an equal opportunity providers and employers.